today in black history

September 20, 2014

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is stabbed in a Harlem store while promoting his autobiographical book “Stride Toward Freedom” in 1958.

Today in Black America - January 4

POSTED: January 04, 2010, 12:00 am

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The New York Times

In Health Bill for Everyone, Provisions for a Few

Alabama Democrat Casts His Lot With G.O.P.

U.S. Loan Effort Is Seen as Adding to Housing Woes

Next Up on Cable TV, Higher Bill for Consumers

Suffolk County Executive Weighing Primary Challenge to Paterson

Criticized as Too Sedate, Public Advocate’s Office Intends to Get Louder

Prisons and Budgets


The Christian Science Monitor

John Brennan rails on Dick Cheney, explains 'systemic failure'

Calling it ‘war’, Obama pegs Christmas Day attack to Al Qaeda


Baltimore Sun

Baltimore homicides total 238 for 2009

More choices for Baltimore 8th-graders

A second chance


Detroit Free Press


Feds probe Detroit's pensions

Internet effort aims to get more Detroiters connected

New year brings challenges for schools, state


Washington Post

Aughts were a lost decade for U.S. economy, workers

Sleepy teens may be more prone to depression, study says

Census counts on partnerships to find hard-to-reach groups

At Landover middle school, philosophy is part of lunch menu

How Democrats can avoid a midterm rout in 2010


Atlanta Journal Constitution

Unions, Democrats helped Reed pull off daring strategy

Mayor-elect Reed: ‘You will see action’


Obama effigy hanged in Jimmy Carter's hometown

Secret Service looking into Obama effigy in Plains, Ga


Chicago Tribune

West Side grocery an interesting development

Dick Cheney's war vs. explosive undies


Star-Ledger

Newark homicides increase for first time in 3 years

N.J. Gov. Corzine signs bill modifying handgun law

New Jersey Legislature should approve bills to help ex-cons stay out of prison


Los Angeles Times

Lame-duck role may not suit Schwarzenegger

Donald Sterling is generous, impolitic and eager to be liked

 
 
 
 

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